Conestoga Diesel Injection

 

1321 Byerland church Rd.

Willow Street PA, 17584-9776

Hours: Monday through Friday 8:00AM to 5:00PM

Phone 717-806-5561  FAX 717-806-5572

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At Conestoga Diesel Injection, we feel that empowering our customers is the best way to achieve total satisfaction with your engine.  On these pages are helpful documents and links that will assist you in educating yourself about our products, and best practices.

This section is under development, so if you don't see much here yet, please check back again.

Fuel Injector Information Section.

Why do Common Rail Injectors fail?
Common rail diesel fuel injection systems produce greater power,efficiency, and cleaner operation than prior types of diesel fuel injection systems. One key to accomplishing these gains is a common rail system operates at pressures around 4 times that of traditional systems and with much tighter part clearances and tolerances. The main causes of common rail injector failure are:
• Diesel fuel contamination
• Inadequate fuel filtration
• Water in the fuel system
• Debris in the fuel system
• Improper injector installation
DIESEL FUEL CONTAMINATION
The key component in the common rail injector is the control valve assembly. In this assembly, fuel under very high pressure passes through an orifice, which is sealed by a check ball around 1mm in diameter. An example of a new control valve body surface is pictured to the right. Note the uniform grinding of the orifice. Contamination from water and other debris has an abrasive effect on the orifice and can quickly lead to a poor seal between the valve and the check ball, resulting in poor injector performance including starting issues, poor fuel economy and performance, and rough running. Above are two examples of control valve bodies which have had check ball seat erosion. To the right is an example of a control valve body and plunger which have been exposed to water. Water can be present in diesel fuel due to condensation
of outside air in the vehicle fuel tank or bulk fuel storage. Debris flows through the system from deposits in the fuel
tank or from other degrading engine parts. Debris can also be introduced into the fuel system during repairs if care is not taken. When replacing filters always use a micron rating equal to the OEM recommendation and keep up with scheduled filter maintenance. On the next page are two more examples of damage small debris in the fuel system can cause. To the right are two more examples of fuel contamination. The left picture is a control valve assembly fuel inlet which has been
completely blocked by small metal debris. This severely limits or completely restricts fuel flow to the injector. On the right side is the needle from an injector nozzle which has metallic debris embedded into the tip. Either instance will cause the injector nozzle to remain operesulting in smoke, knocking, misfire, and no-start conditions along with the potential to severely damage the piston and/or cylinder. Following recommended maintenance procedures and intervals can help eliminate these occurances. 
IMPROPER INJECTOR INSTALLATION
Another major cause of premature injector failure is improper injector installation. Missing or improperly installed seal rings or nozzle washers, along with incorrect injector torque, will result in poor injector performance, misfires, starting issues, and poor fuel economy with black smoke. Be aware of the nozzle washer falling off of the injector or not properly seating during installation. Be sure the prior nozzle washer is not in the cylinder when installing a new injector. A missing or incorrectly installed nozzle washer will allow combustion leakage past the nozzle washer and will be evidenced by excessive combustion residue on the injector when removed. Also, seal rings can roll out of their grooves during installation. On 5.9L injectors proper installation of the fuel inlet stud is critical. For injectors where electrical connectors are attached to stator studs, incorrect torque of the connectors can result in engine misfires and stator damage.
ACTION TO TAKE
When replacing fuel system components which did not give a normal service life it is critical to analyze what caused the failure of the parts you are replacing. When undertaking these repairs you should always replace fuel and air filters as well as check the quality of fuel coming from the fuel tank. Fuel systems showing characteristics of fuel contamination require a complete inspection and, if needed, replacement of components which may still contain contamination. Failure to do this can lead to subsequent failure of newly installed injectors.
Common rail diesel fuel injection systems produce greater power,efficiency, and cleaner operation than prior types of diesel fuel injection systems. One key to accomplishing these gains is a common rail system operates at pressures around 4 times that of traditional systems and with much tighter part clearances and tolerances. The main causes of common rail injector failure are:
• Diesel fuel contamination
• Inadequate fuel filtration
• Water in the fuel system
• Debris in the fuel system
• Improper injector installation
DIESEL FUEL CONTAMINATION
The key component in the common rail injector is the control valve assembly. In this assembly, fuel under very high pressure passes through an orifice, which is sealed by a check ball around 1mm in diameter. An example of a new control valve body surface is pictured to the right. Note the uniform grinding of the orifice. Contamination from water and other debris has an abrasive effect on the orifice and can quickly lead to a poor seal between the valve and the check ball, resulting in poor injector performance including starting issues, poor fuel economy and performance, and rough running. Above are two examples of control valve bodies which have had check ball seat erosion. To the right is an example of a control valve body and plunger which have been exposed to water. Water can be present in diesel fuel due to condensation
of outside air in the vehicle fuel tank or bulk fuel storage. Debris flows through the system from deposits in the fuel
tank or from other degrading engine parts. Debris can also be introduced into the fuel system during repairs if care is not taken. When replacing filters always use a micron rating equal to the OEM recommendation and keep up with scheduled filter maintenance. On the next page are two more examples of damage small debris in the fuel system can cause. To the right are two more examples of fuel contamination. The left picture is a control valve assembly fuel inlet which has been
completely blocked by small metal debris. This severely limits or completely restricts fuel flow to the injector. On the right side is the needle from an injector nozzle which has metallic debris embedded into the tip. Either instance will cause the injector nozzle to remain operesulting in smoke, knocking, misfire, and no-start conditions along with the potential to severely damage the piston and/or cylinder. Following recommended maintenance procedures and intervals can help eliminate these occurances. 
IMPROPER INJECTOR INSTALLATION
Another major cause of premature injector failure is improper injector installation. Missing or improperly installed seal rings or nozzle washers, along with incorrect injector torque, will result in poor injector performance, misfires, starting issues, and poor fuel economy with black smoke. Be aware of the nozzle washer falling off of the injector or not properly seating during installation. Be sure the prior nozzle washer is not in the cylinder when installing a new injector. A missing or incorrectly installed nozzle washer will allow combustion leakage past the nozzle washer and will be evidenced by excessive combustion residue on the injector when removed. Also, seal rings can roll out of their grooves during installation. On 5.9L injectors proper installation of the fuel inlet stud is critical. For injectors where electrical connectors are attached to stator studs, incorrect torque of the connectors can result in engine misfires and stator damage.
ACTION TO TAKE
When replacing fuel system components which did not give a normal service life it is critical to analyze what caused the failure of the parts you are replacing. When undertaking these repairs you should always replace fuel and air filters as well as check the quality of fuel coming from the fuel tank. Fuel systems showing characteristics of fuel contamination require a complete inspection and, if needed, replacement of components which may still contain contamination. Failure to do this can lead to subsequent failure of newly installed injectors.

Common rail diesel fuel injection systems produce greater power,efficiency, and cleaner operation than prior types of diesel fuel injection systems. One key to accomplishing these gains is a common rail system operates at pressures around 4 times that of traditional systems and with much tighter part clearances and tolerances. The main causes of common rail injector failure are:


• Diesel fuel contamination
• Inadequate fuel filtration
• Water in the fuel system
• Debris in the fuel system
• Improper injector installation


DIESEL FUEL CONTAMINATION
The key component in the common rail injector is the control valve assembly. In this assembly, fuel under very high pressure passes through an orifice, which is sealed by a check ball around 1mm in diameter. Contamination from water and other debris has an abrasive effect on the orifice and can quickly lead to a poor seal between the valve and the check ball, resulting in poor injector performance including starting issues, poor fuel economy and performance, and rough running. A control valve body and plunger which have been exposed to water, will rust and corrode. Water can be present in diesel fuel due to condensation of outside air in the vehicle fuel tank or bulk fuel storage. Debris can flow through the system from deposits in the fuel tank or from other degrading engine parts. Debris can also be introduced into the fuel system during repairs if care is not taken. When replacing filters always use a micron rating equal to the OEM recommendation and keep up with scheduled filter maintenance. Two more examples of fuel contamination would be a control valve assembly fuel inlet which has been completely blocked by small metal debris. This would severely limit or completely restrict fuel flow to the injector. another example is the needle from an injector nozzle which has metallic debris embedded into the tip. Either instance will cause the injector nozzle to remain open resulting in smoke, knocking, misfire, and no-start conditions along with the potential to severely damage the piston and/or cylinder. Following recommended maintenance procedures and intervals can help eliminate these occurances.


IMPROPER INJECTOR INSTALLATION
Another major cause of premature injector failure is improper injector installation. Missing or improperly installed seal rings or nozzle washers, along with incorrect injector torque, will result in poor injector performance, misfires, starting issues, and poor fuel economy with black smoke. Be aware of the nozzle washer falling off of the injector or not properly seating during installation. Be sure the prior nozzle washer is not in the cylinder when installing a new injector. A missing or incorrectly installed nozzle washer will allow combustion leakage past the nozzle washer and will be evidenced by excessive combustion residue on the injector when removed. Also, seal rings can roll out of their grooves during installation. On 5.9L injectors proper installation of the fuel inlet stud is critical. For injectors where electrical connectors are attached to stator studs, incorrect torque of the connectors can result in engine misfires and stator damage.


ACTION TO TAKE
When replacing fuel system components which did not give a normal service life it is critical to analyze what caused the failure of the parts you are replacing. When undertaking these repairs you should always replace fuel and air filters as well as check the quality of fuel coming from the fuel tank. Fuel systems showing characteristics of fuel contamination require a complete inspection and, if needed, replacement of components which may still contain contamination. Failure to do this can lead to subsequent failure of newly installed injectors.

Common rail diesel fuel injection systems produce greater power,efficiency, and cleaner operation than prior types of diesel fuel injection systems. One key to accomplishing these gains is a common rail system operates at pressures around 4 times that of traditional systems and with much tighter part clearances and tolerances. The main causes of common rail injector failure are:
• Diesel fuel contamination
• Inadequate fuel filtration
• Water in the fuel system
• Debris in the fuel system
• Improper injector installation
DIESEL FUEL CONTAMINATION
The key component in the common rail injector is the control valve assembly. In this assembly, fuel under very high pressure passes through an orifice, which is sealed by a check ball around 1mm in diameter. An example of a new control valve body surface is pictured to the right. Note the uniform grinding of the orifice. Contamination from water and other debris has an abrasive effect on the orifice and can quickly lead to a poor seal between the valve and the check ball, resulting in poor injector performance including starting issues, poor fuel economy and performance, and rough running. Above are two examples of control valve bodies which have had check ball seat erosion. To the right is an example of a control valve body and plunger which have been exposed to water. Water can be present in diesel fuel due to condensation
of outside air in the vehicle fuel tank or bulk fuel storage. Debris flows through the system from deposits in the fuel
tank or from other degrading engine parts. Debris can also be introduced into the fuel system during repairs if care is not taken. When replacing filters always use a micron rating equal to the OEM recommendation and keep up with scheduled filter maintenance. On the next page are two more examples of damage small debris in the fuel system can cause. To the right are two more examples of fuel contamination. The left picture is a control valve assembly fuel inlet which has been
completely blocked by small metal debris. This severely limits or completely restricts fuel flow to the injector. On the right side is the needle from an injector nozzle which has metallic debris embedded into the tip. Either instance will cause the injector nozzle to remain operesulting in smoke, knocking, misfire, and no-start conditions along with the potential to severely damage the piston and/or cylinder. Following recommended maintenance procedures and intervals can help eliminate these occurances. 
IMPROPER INJECTOR INSTALLATION
Another major cause of premature injector failure is improper injector installation. Missing or improperly installed seal rings or nozzle washers, along with incorrect injector torque, will result in poor injector performance, misfires, starting issues, and poor fuel economy with black smoke. Be aware of the nozzle washer falling off of the injector or not properly seating during installation. Be sure the prior nozzle washer is not in the cylinder when installing a new injector. A missing or incorrectly installed nozzle washer will allow combustion leakage past the nozzle washer and will be evidenced by excessive combustion residue on the injector when removed. Also, seal rings can roll out of their grooves during installation. On 5.9L injectors proper installation of the fuel inlet stud is critical. For injectors where electrical connectors are attached to stator studs, incorrect torque of the connectors can result in engine misfires and stator damage.
ACTION TO TAKE
When replacing fuel system components which did not give a normal service life it is critical to analyze what caused the failure of the parts you are replacing. When undertaking these repairs you should always replace fuel and air filters as well as check the quality of fuel coming from the fuel tank. Fuel systems showing characteristics of fuel contamination require a complete inspection and, if needed, replacement of components which may still contain contamination. Failure to do this can lead to subsequent failure of newly installed injectors.
Fuel Injection Pump Section

Choosing the right Moose Pump
Or "How do I know what pump is right for my truck or van?"

Choosing the right pump is dependent on several factors. These factors are a combination of the mechanical characteristics of your vehicle, plus other environmental factors.


For a Bull Moose Pump, ask yourself the following questions:


Do I have A turbocharger?
Do I have an Intercooler? or "Not yet but I am strongly considering one."
Do I have a Pyrometer to monitor EGT's (exhaust gas temperatures)?
Am I the only driver? or "I will train any driver how to watch the pyrometer."
I do not tow heavily or often. or "I don't worry about smoke and its effects on my trailer."
I do not have emissions testing? or "I will get the Hypermax Puff Limiter option if I do."
I do not drive often on steep hills or at high elevation? or "I understand that gear ratio (lower) is better in order to build enough boost to keep EGT's down."


If the answer to all of the above is yes, then a Bull Moose is a good fit for you. If one or more answers are negative, quiz yourself for the next lower power level, the Moose Junior.


For a Moose Junior Pump, ask yourself the following questions:


Do I have A turbocharger? or "I am strongly considering one."
Do I have a Pyrometer to monitor EGT's (exhaust gas temperatures)?
Am I the only driver? or "I will train any driver how to watch the pyrometer."
I do not tow heavily or often. or "I understand that insufficient air (no turbo or intercooler) could reduce my towing capacity."
I do not have emissions testing? or "I will get the Hypermax Puff Limiter option if I do."
I do not drive often on steep hills or at high elevation? or "I understand that gear ratio (lower) is better in order to keep air moving through the engine to keep EGT's down."


If the answer to all of the above is yes, then a Moose Junior is a good fit for you. If one or more answers are negative, quiz yourself for the next lower power level, the Baby Moose.


For a Baby Moose Pump:


Do I have a Pyrometer to monitor EGT's (exhaust gas temperatures)?

If you have a pyrometer, then a Baby Moose is a good fit for you. We do not recommend owning an IDI (even with a stock factory pump) without a pyrometer with the temperature probe installed within 3" of the exhaust manifold flange, as Exhaust Gas Temperatures must not exceed 1250 degrees fahrenheit for any length of time.


A word about towing (or total weight) and our pumps
The above questions are meant to help sort out in your mind at least the issues that confront the IDI owner looking for more power. The formula for diesel power has always been an easy one. Fuel + Air + timing = power. Reduce any of the three from optimum, and you will loose power. Reduce air without reducing fuel, and you will have high EGT's. Reduce fuel without reducing air, and you will not have an EGT problem, but you may not have enough power. With turbocharged engines, fuel, RPM and turbo parameters all factor into what kind of power can be had at what point in the RPM band. Timing is also critical for optimizing the combination of fuel and air. When we say air, what we are really talking about is oxygen. More boost, does not necessarily mean more oxygen. If air is highly presurized, it will get hotter. Hotter air places the oxygen molecules farther apart, and this results in a low oxygen content at say 20PSI, versus maybe 10 PSI of very dense (cold air). Vehicles that tow, generate a lot of boost when turbocharged. More oxygen is needed to burn additional fuel beyond what stock pumps provide. A combination of a heavy load, low engine RPM's and no intercooler (and low turbo boost), is a formula for high EGT's. While exhaust gas temperatures can be regulated by throttle position, it is imparative that the performance enthusiast understand the relationship of fuel and air in an engine, so that disappointment with our pumps can be avoided. Sometimes a turbocharger is unable to deliver enough boost (or volume of oxygen) even under full load and full throttle conditions. When this happens, it may be time to look at upgrading the turbocharger or intercooling. Conestoga Diesel Injection has solutions for helping you meet the challenge of adding more oxygen to your engine so the additional fuel your pump provides can be utilized. If you need additional help in selecting the right pump, feel free to call us. We are always happy to discuss your IDI concerns.